Share
Share
Share
 

Half of U.S. population’s data exposed in huge Equifax data breach

Photo: Petr Kratochvil/Public Domain Pictures

Equifax, a US-based credit reporting agency, has confirmed that sensitive consumer data belonging to over 143 million customers was compromised earlier this year.

According to the official press release, hackers were able to exploit one of their website applications, allowing them access to certain files including “names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and, in some instances, driver’s license numbers” of customers within the United States.

Credit card numbers belong to about 209,000 US consumers and dispute documents related to another 182,000 US consumers were also accessed in the hack which took place between May and July of this year.

A number of Canadian and UK consumer records were also accessed during the breach.

According to them, their core reporting applications were not breached, which means you should not have to worry too much about your credit score being illegally modified.

Equifax discovered the unauthorized access on July 29 of this year and acted immediately to stop the intrusion. The company promptly engaged a leading, independent cybersecurity firm that has been conducting a comprehensive forensic review to determine the scope of the intrusion, including the specific data impacted. Equifax also reported the criminal access to law enforcement and continues to work with authorities. While the company’s investigation is substantially complete, it remains ongoing and is expected to be completed in the coming weeks.

With the numbers accounting for just about one in every two US citizens, the likelihood of identity theft is now much greater as a result of critical details such as Social Security and credit card numbers being leaked.

Equifax launched a dedicated website at www.equifaxsecurity2017.com to outline steps that should be taken to confirm whether your data was indeed compromised, and what to do if your information is out in the open.

The credit company also stated that a top security team was hired to discover how such an intrusion took place, and what needs to be done to prevent it in the future.

At this point however, it may be too late for the company to rebuild client trust given the severity of the leak.

Whether you’re a novice or seasoned traveler, there is always that one person or group of people that occasionally bug…
If you’re buying a Samsung Galaxy S9 or S9+ from Verizon, expect to see Yahoo-based apps and Bixby news content…
Just two months after the unveiling of the Galaxy S9 and S9+, Samsung is will now offer more internal storage…
As cryptominers shift their attention away from GPUs, graphics cards prices may plummet as shipments are expected drop by as…
Facebook has started beta testing a new feature that allows fans of pages to limit conversations to their friends and…
Caribbean Airlines has joined the ranks of other international airlines by introducing a premium economy cabin. Dubbed “Caribbean Plus”, rows…
It’s 2018 and there are still many websites that believe in forcing users to watch autoplay videos. That’s right, we’re…
Sometimes I like to record a snippet of what I’m listening to on my phone’s iTunes player to post to…
If you’re an iPhone user (or use any iOS device as a matter), it may be time to consider using…
Like many other mobile phone manufacturers, Apple can’t keep anything a secret. In a recently leaked internal memo (a lengthy…
We're looking for up and coming writers to join our expanding team!